Artist Statement
Education
Solo Exhibits
Curated and Juried Exhibits
Group Exhibits
University Teaching Experience
Workshops
Visiting Artist Lectures/ Conferences
Visiting Artist Residencies
Related Education
Publications & Reviews
Related Professional Experience
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Click to enlarge thumbnails.

Hunger Shirt

Soul Shield

Flak Shield

Womb Shield

Fatigue Shield

Drip

Worry Coat

Virum

Telos

Telos - detail

Gut

 

 

Home Faculty Keren Lowell


ARTIST STATEMENT

An onslaught tires us to the bone. Its prolonged attack of chores, tasks, betrayals, brutalities, lies, expectations, make us weary and force us to question our resolve and resiliency. An onslaught always wears us down.

The work in the exhibit "Onslaught" was made during the last two years of the Bush administration, and dealt with the weariness and inertia that set in when a person faces a barrage of endless attacks from forces too large to subdue. These attacks can be political and economic, or in my case, domestic. The housework needs to get done, the cell phone recharged, lunches made, the newspaper read, deceptions absorbed, the gas tank filled, and decisions made continually about how to live and what to believe. The recycling bin fills while stories about greed and the betrayal of public trust bombard me. White House duplicity leaks out; warfare goes on.

So I search for a weapon or armor, like a shield, something to defend myself from these forces, something to acknowledge the forces within me. Sometimes I don't know which one. Am I trying to keep fatigue at bay, or am I already fatigued and merely looking for protection and someplace to hide? Do I make work for myself in order to find a reason to keep going? Am I trying to protect myself from the exhaustion, or has it already won?

When I shaped my shields, I used ratty worn-out rags, washcloths, towels and cloth diapers, and gave them a rigid skin of plaster of paris. Though barriers of a kind, they are vulnerable, already torn. And the repeated motions used to create the stitches, loops, interlacings and knots of this fiber work is related to the too-often overlooked, dismissed and undervalued domestic kingdom.

The performance piece "HouseWork" is about the work done by those who maintain our environments, including but not limited to the domestic one. This work is also often invisible, monotonous, underpaid or unpaid, repetitive, often never-ending, and necessary. "HouseWork" was composed as a sequence of episodes, each one loosely based on some physical aspect of housekeeping: folding laundry, washing dishes, sorting and picking up household detritus, cooking, vacuuming, unpacking and putting away groceries, etc. As the performance progress, the work was undone faster than it was accomplished. I'm interested in the political aspects of this work, and I want to explore the kinds of rhythms that drive this kind of activity.

toptop


EDUCATION


SOLO EXHIBITS

GROUP EXHIBITS

UNIVERSITY TEACHING EXPERIENCE

WORKSHOPS

VISITING ARTIST LECTURES/CONFERENCES

VISITING ARTIST RESIDENCIES

RELATED EDUCATION

PUBLICATIONS and REVIEWS

RELATED PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

AWARDS